Nutrition Info Hub » Label reading guide

Label reading guide

Nutrition Info Hub » Label reading guide

Label reading guide

Not only does a food label tell us what a product is, but it also tells us important information about the ingredients and nutrients that product contains. By understanding this information, we can make sure to choose food products that suit our health and lifestyle needs.

 

Most food packages have a Nutrition Information Panel (NIP) which tells you the quantity of various nutrients a food contains per serve, as well as per 100 g or 100 ml.

When reading the NIP:

• always read the per 100g column to compare similar products, because the serve sizes differ between brands

• always compare similar products, for example compare one brand of yoghurt with another brand of yoghurt.

 

What to look for when reading food labels (per 100g)

Bread

- More than 5g fibre

- Less than 600mg sodium

 

 

Breakfast Cereal

- More than 6g fibre

- Less than 600mg sodium

- Less than 15g sugar (without dried fruit)

 

Milk and yoghurt

- Less than 2g total fat

- Less than 1.5g saturated fat

- Less than 15g sugar

- More than 150mg calcium

 

Meat and alternatives

- Less than 10g total fat

- Less than 3g saturated fat

- Less than 750mg sodium

 

Savoury crackers, crispbreads and crisps

- Less than 10g total fat

- Less than 3g saturated fat

- More than 3g fibre

- Less than 600mg sodium

 

Sweet snack bars and biscuits

- Less than 10g total fat

- Less than 3g saturated fat

- Less than 15g sugar

- More than 3g fibre

- Less than 400mg sodium

 

Cheese

- Compare products and choose the one with the lowest total fat, saturated fat and sodium levels.

- Even reduced fat cheese will contain approximately 25% fat

 

 

Fats and oils

- Choose monounsaturated and polyunsaturated margarines and oils instead of butter

- ‘Lite’ oils are not necessarily lower in fat

- ‘Vegetable blend’ oils can still be high in saturated fat

 

 

 

Click here to download this fact sheet as a PDF